Biology of Sport
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Journal Abstract
 
The role of visual input during rotation: the case of discus throwing
M Lenoir, L Mazyn
Biol Sport 2005; 22(1):53-66
ICID: 891554
Article type: Original article
IC™ Value: 10.26
Abstract provided by Publisher
 
In order to investigate the contribution of visual information in the control of a skill involving rotation, ten experienced discus throwers performed throws under full vision, peripheral vision only, central vision only, and blindly. Throwing performance was significantly inferior when only central vision was available as compared to the full and peripheral vision conditions (38.55±3.14 m vs. 40.24±3.63 m and 40.10±3.78 m respectively; p=0.002). No differences between the central vision and no vision condition occurred (38.55±3.14 m and 39.32±3.40 m respectively; p>0.05). Better performance in the full and peripheral vision conditions as compared to central vision only underlines the importance of peripheral information in the control of ego-rotation, and provides support for two functionally different visual pathways. The lack of performance differences between full vision, peripheral vision, and no vision indicates that experts may have learned to rely on other, non-visual information sources during the acquisition process or that they have learned to quickly adapt to changing informational constraints.

ICID 891554
 
FULL TEXT 261 KB


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